Monday, February 21, 2011

The What is Where?

My son kept sneezing this morning, over and over, and I thought that he must be getting the cold that I am just getting over.  He finally looked at me and said, "Bean!  Bean!"  He had stuck a dry bean up his left nostril.  Luckily I could see it and got it out easily by running my finger down the outside of his nose.  I just hope it was the only one up there!

Friday, February 18, 2011

Where's the Money Tree?

Since my son's doctor recommended taking him off of all of his medications and supplements and doing more testing, we have pulled him off of everything except for his vitamins.  But they are very strong, and we are down to 1/2 dose per day.  We just haven't decided what testing to do now.  I read an article this morning called, "8 Facts About Autism the Media Is Not Covering" by Holly Robinson Peete.  Number one on her list:  "Autism Is Unaffordable."  It is very hard as the parent of an autistic child to decide just where to spend the money.  Therapy, bio-medical appointments and supplements, equipment???  Nothing, and I mean nothing associated with autism is inexpensive.

I am researching a new therapy called Floortime.  It promises great results, and it is mainly between parent (or sibling, babysitter, etc...) and child.  The question is, do I keep on with more testing and meds, or more occupational therapy, AND add in Floortime?  I was reading a report last night that stated autistic children who get 25 hours of therapy a week see the best results.  25 hours!  A one-hour occupational therapist visit costs $125.00.  We are one of the lucky ones that get some of that cost covered by our insurance after we meet the yearly deductible, but it still adds up fast.  Just a few days ago, I was researching a different therapy called ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis.)  I have even considered buying a DVD training program to learn how to implement this at home.  But everyone claims that their therapy, program, the best!  A "can't do-without-solution!"  I understand that there is no cure for autism.  I know that my son will always have his quirks and possibly have very little verbal skills throughout his life.  But I want to give him every chance that I can to lead a wonderful life, no matter what that will mean in his world.  I never want to tell him at age 18 that I gave up on him at age 3.  I will continue to fight.